RadJoy RadJoy Revealed Gold In A Hole In A Street In Fargo 1 1

“We dedicate this yellow-gold magic encapsulated in the bundle of yarn to unsung heroes–plants that grow in cracks in cement.” People Binding the Earth in Fargo, ND by Maya Gelfman and Roie Avidan. Photo by Mind the Heart

For our People Binding the Earth project, we’re encouraging people to carry some of our organic golden yarn wherever they go, so they can make a little gift of beauty for hurt places when and where they encounter them. But sometimes, it seems, that special yarn has to travel a long way before it finds the right home. The story below is from Maya Gelfman and Roie Avidan, a young Israeli couple who created Mind the Heart, an ongoing project to call attention to neglected places with red yarn. It was their work that was a big inspiration to us to launch People Binding the Earth.  Roie and Maya are currently traveling around the U.S. in their van and have rejuvenated many places en route, from the Ojai Foundation to the Houston City Hall to the National Cathedral. Here’s the saga of the golden yarn we sent them for their Global Earth Exchange.
We have been carrying this magical thread with us, everywhere, since we returned from DC to Seattle.
It went with us to the Olympic Peninsula, to North Cascades, through countless tiny towns across Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming.  It accompanied us to expanses in Glacier National Park and through flowering creeks in the Black Hills. From Devil’s Tower to alleyways in Billings to farms in Newcastle.
All this time, we were searching for the right spot. A place where the thread would fit, and that would fit the thread.
We envisioned burnt husks of trees where fires had passed, upturned & injured earth in the mining lands, romantic dilapidated structures by the side of the road.
And through this all, it never felt right.
Then, yesterday in Fargo, North Dakota, the yellow thread found its spot.  No drama, nothing monumental. “Just” a green being protruding from the sidewalk.
We dedicate this yellow-gold magic encapsulated in the bundle of yarn to unsung heroes–plants that grow in cracks in cement. We see them on the sidewalks, on walls, growing and living in unpredictable places, against all odds. They’re here to remind us that all of this urban habitat that we have created is a part of and built upon a natural habitat.
And that nature prevails. Nature finds a way. It’s here to give us perspective and to remind us that we are part of it all–the living web of all things.
Our connection to and respect of this web can and should start anywhere we are, and from there expand to encompass it all.
We invite you to be part of People Binding the Earth, too! See the block below for details.
To discover other stories of inspiring people, stories, photos, and ideas, subscribe to

Trebbe Johnson
Trebbe JohnsonFounder
Trebbe is the author of The World Is a Waiting Lover and 101 Ways to Make Guerrilla Beauty. Her new book, Radical Joy for Hard Times: Finding Meaning and Making Beauty, will be published in Fall 2018 by North Atlantic Books. Her articles about people’s emotional and spiritual relationship with nature have appeared in Orion, Sierra, Ecopsychology, The Ecologist, The Nation, Harper’s and other magazines. She lives with her husband, Andrew Gardner, in rural northeastern Pennsylvania, a region currently under exploitation by natural gas companies.

MORE RADICAL JOY REVEALED

  • Peregrine Falcon

The Beauty Impulse

No matter what’s knocked us down or how long we’ve been there, we can not only survive but thrive. Flattened by grief—ecological, social, personal—we can still be pierced by beauty, wonder, and delight. These gifts [...]

  • 800px Bindweed Plant Breaking Through Asphalt 8 P1030678

The Resilience of Green

I am sitting on a fold-up chair at the top of the asphalt driveway which brings us halfway up the mountain to where our house sits. The house was built in 1987, and the driveway [...]

More Revealed

SUBSCRIBE

JOIN OUR NEWSLETTER

Radical Joy Revealed is a weekly message of inspiration about finding and making beauty in wounded places.